Wearing the Great Kilt – A Retrospective

It has been a while since I posted my “How to make an Outlander costume – Part 1” article. It covered all the basics of Great Kilt folding and Arisaid folding, and it was just so much fun to make, to fold and to write.

But here’s the catch: I never really finished the section of Kilt Types! The slightly irritating “will soon be updated” marred the decor that the Great Kilts flair had created. Soon became months quite quickly.. But hey – yes yes – it has been updated at last! Quickly visit the article and find out what new Kilt and Arisaid types have arrived in Baytree land.

Fun

Don’t mind me…

Since every photoshoot process takes about six to more than ten hours to do, to process and to touch up, it is always a shame when great photos are not good enough to be shown in the main article. And because some are just to precious or to cool to leave behind, I thought I would make a little behind the scenes article to give you an impression of the entire process behind a photoshoot like that. And just as this garments is awesome to alter and to re-create, it is also as much fun behind the scenes to wear and to mess around with, which sometimes results in quirky and funny photos. Continue reading

2015 in review

Perhaps a little late – but I found this jewel in my mailbox and I really wanted to share with you – and relive – the excitement of 2015.

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for my blog.. It amazes me that people actually read what I write and find joy in my projects. It makes my day, everyday!

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 4,200 times in 2015. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Cheers!

Happy New Year!

I wish you all the most creative, happy, healthy and enlightened new year full of new ideas, chances and new stories to tell.

This year has been so exciting for me. I have made costumes I am most proud of, I have expanded my horizon by starting my own Youtube channel and above all I have had the most fun as Ava Baytree.

So here is to a new – amazing – year.

Welcome Baytree Costumes and Ava Baytree to 2016!

Love, Ava

Merry Christmas

Hello everyone,

Have a lovely, lovely christmas! If you are with friends, family, just the two of you and even if you are alone: make it cosy and a day to never forget. Do whatever you want!!

To give you a little impression of my first Christmas day (yes we have two in the Netherlands, lucky us 😉 ), I thought I’d show you what my perfect Christmas looks like:

Our first Baytree Christmas! How exciting!

Merry Christmas to all my fellow WordPressers, sewers and crafters as well as everyone else reading this little post and watching the video.

Love you and thank you for reading! ❤

Ps. Little peek behind the post: this 30 second video took more than an hour to render, aahh

Ava Baytree: Trailer!

After hard, hard work I can finally show to you the piece I’ve been working on for the last few weeks.

And this time it is not a costume or a DIY! It is a video! See it for yourself:

Tell me what you think of the Baytree Costumes trailer <3!

If you could be bothered drop a like over on Youtube and if you really like the content: subscribe to my new channel!

I love you all,
Ava

Ps. It also gives away a new project I’ve been working on!

How to make Ygritte’s costume from Game of Thrones

Perhaps too late for Halloween this year, but certainly not less inspirational! Let’s celebrate creativity with this new tutorial. This time we’ll discover the costuming world of Game of Thrones.

After a long period of trying to keep this exciting project silent (just to give myself a little less stress), I can now finally come with all the details. And they are plenty!

If you have been following my blog, you know that I am always inspired by a variation of TV series and films. From period drama to fantasy, the cinematic scenery and images always speak to my imagination and from there to creativity. I have been working very hard on two amazing pieces from the enormous TV series Game of Thrones. I wanted to make a twin piece, and what immediately came to mind: Ygritte and Jon! (Pre season 6: Have you seen this picture already?). Click here to see my article on how to make Jon Snow’s fur, ecologically! And click here to see my Youtube video on this costume!

I based my design on this version from the show

I like that guy on the right haha!

The process was long and hard, as always, but again very insightful and the new fabrics and techniques were so exciting. I always enjoy learning something new (said the proud autodidact).

Ygritte 2

This is the result. If you have seen my last (and first) project inspired by the TV series from Outlander, you know how much I can meddle with one particular project. The most irritating thing always being the pattern (argh). Continue reading

DIY Duct tape dress form: Do’s and Don’ts

Let’s celebrate the last bits of august with a DIY project.

The duct tape dress form: the best outcome for any desperate sewer or seamstress who keeps using him or herself as a pincushion. And for all of us who just don’t want to spend a great deal of money on an adjustable dress form.

I wouldn’t want to bore you all with another long tutorial, and I wouldn’t have to! Since the whole internet is full of wonderful articles that teach you just how to get the duct tape dress form done nicely, I’ll only  and shortly break down my own process for you.

My own process for two dress forms
I used 2x 25 meter duct tape (which was not really enough), 2 cans of isolation foam (a small one and a big one), loads of used (news)paper, 3 pvc pipes (for two dress form stands) & some fittings, of course an old tee and microwave foil (where I first used extra fabric).

Necessities dress formI followed the tutorials I found online and within half an hour I already had the duct tape layout. I had it then cut out by someone who I could trust with scissors, which resulted in a piece cut of my bra :/.
But it was very much fun to do!

I then stuffed the first form loosely with paper, closed every hole with cardboard, stuck the stand in and began filling it with isolation foam. Two errors became clear afterwards: too fancy on the paper and too quick with the foam. It had way too many air pockets because of the big props of paper, so I noted that the second should have smaller paper props in it. I had to correct quite some bumps here and there when I became a little too impatient with the isolation foam, so I noted to reduce the stress a bit on that part. The next form I made was my revise-de-faux and it went much better than expected. I used fabric to cover up the shoulders and neck for the first form and then it became clear to me that microwave foil is much easier and cheaper. So I used that while making the second one. I now have two little sisters added to the family and they are awesome (and very quiet) ;). Continue reading

How to make an Outlander costume – Part 2: Claire’s jacket / bodice

An Outlander Claire’s jacket tutorial for you! In season one from Starz’ Outlander, Claire mostly wears these warm wool blend jackets above a tartan skirt that look so Outlandish, I had to make one myself. I hope you’ll be inspired by my own process.

Still I can’t seem to keep my tutorials short and to the point – Oops

I loved doing this project, it was very insightful. If you’ve seen Part 1 of my Outlander costume, you’ll know that the traditional great kilt / Arisaid was actually really easy to make. Pleating was basically all you had to do. Of course my Arisaid is not true to Outlander, because they wear nicely tailored petticoats in the show. But I thought pleating a Scottish Arisaid would get me a bit more into that traditional and historical part of Scotland and its practicality in clothing. I just really wanted to learn how to pleat a great kilt (and it is also so much easier!).

These photos show on which design I have based my Claire inspired bodice: 1, 2, 3.

The finished costume

Click here to fast forward to the actual sewing how-to. Continue reading